June 2017 News and Research Roundup

Advertising Restictions, Cigarettes, Disparities, E-Cigarettes, Flavors (including Menthol), Healthy Retailers, Little cigars/Cigarillos, Pharmacies, Product Packaging, Tobacco21, Youth

Welcome to CounterTobacco.org’s “News and Research Roundup!” Each month we post a summary of the latest research, reports, and news stories on counteracting tobacco product sales and marketing at the point of sale (POS). Keeping up with what’s happening in the POS movement all across the country can help you choose policies and strategies that work best for your community. New research can help provide support for your work and evidence for the importance of the “War in the Store.” Have a story you don’t want us to miss? E-mail it to us!

New Research

Point of Sale Advertising

  • Receptivity to Tobacco Advertising and Susceptibility to Tobacco Products, Pediatrics
    • An analysis of data from the nationally representative PATH (Population Assessment of Tobacco and Health) study found that 41% of US youth ages 12-13 and approximately half of youth ages 14-17 were receptive to at least one tobacco advertisement. Receptivity was consistently highest across age groups for e-cigarettes. Receptivity to advertising for any tobacco product was associated with increased susceptibility to cigarette smoking.
    • News story: Noncigarette Tobacco Advertising May be Hazardous to a Teen’s Health, American Academy of Pediatrics
  • Point-of-Sale E-cigarette Advertising Among Tobacco Stores, Journal of Community Health
    • Assessments of tobacco stores in the Omaha metro area in Nebraska between April and June 2014 found that overall, 54.2% of the 463 stores assessed had advertisements for e-cigarettes, while 77% of convenience stores (with or without gas) and 73% of pharmacies or drug stores had e-cigarette advertisements. Stores with POS e-cigarette advertisements were more likely to be located in areas with more non-Hispanic white residents, as well as areas with higher socio-economic status (higher per-capita income and more residents with at least a high school education), compared to stores without POS e-cigarette advertisements.
    • Learn more about e-cigarettes at the point of sale.

Flavored Tobacco Products

Product Watch

Policy Impact

  • Computational Models Used to Assess US Tobacco Control Policies, Nicotine & Tobacco Research
    • This systematic review assessed the evidence from computational models used to project population-level effects of six different tobacco control interventions: taxation, youth prevention, smoke-free policies, mass media campaigns, marketing/advertising restrictions, and product regulation. Researchers found that the effects of taxation were the most robust, with tax increases of $0.71 to $4.63 yielding reductions in smoking prevalence from 8% to 46%. The effects of the other interventions were more heterogeneous, but multi-component interventions also produced more favorable results.
  • Effect of message congruency on attention and recall in pictorial health warning labels, Tobacco Control
    • Researchers found that images captured and held the viewers’ attention better than text. However, smokers who viewed cigarettes packs with graphic health warnings along with a corresponding text warning were more likely to correctly recall the message compared to those who viewed cigarettes packs with graphic health warnings alongside a text-based health warning with a somewhat different theme. The graphic health warning labels proposed by the FDA in 2009 vary in the degree that the message and text are congruent, or reinforce the same message. Researchers suggest that making them congruent could improve the warnings’ effectiveness and be useful in resisting legal challenges.
    • News Story: Pictorial warning labels on tobacco products could help improve communication of risk to smokers, Science Daily

New Reports

Industry News

POS Policy in the Media

Labeling and Packaging

Tobacco-Free Pharmacies and Healthy Retail

Flavored Tobacco Products

Tobacco 21

Find more stories in last month’s News and Research Roundup.

Know of a story that we missed? Email us, and we’ll be sure to include it in next month’s roundup!